What nobody tells you about sex after baby

You’ve had your six week checkup and gotten the green light to have sex again after birth. Okay, well…now what?

Aside from the occasional jokes about over-eager husbands (hey, women have sex drives too) and horror stories about how bad it’s going to hurt, you don’t really hear much about what it’s really like to have sex after baby. We’re going to have a pretty frank discussion about sex and the things nobody tells you about how that works post-baby, so feel free to skip this one if that’s not your thing.

sex after baby
Are we sure that light is actually green? Can it be yellow instead? How about red? Am I even ready for this? Ahhhh!

Just because your OB clears you for sexual activity doesn’t mean you have to jump in before you’re ready.

As always when it comes to intimacy with your partner, communication is important. When you are ready, it’s okay to feel a little apprehensive. While it might be a little uncomfortable the first time or two, sex after baby doesn’t have to hurt, and if it hurts for more than two weeks after you’ve started back, talk with your doctor. That pain isn’t normal and you may need pelvic physiotherapy to help address the underlying problem.

Lube is your friend.

No, really. #allthelube. Those first few times, don’t be afraid to lubricate with abandon, even if that wasn’t your norm before. Breastfeeding and other hormone changes can cause vaginal dryness, which can in turn cause discomfort during intercourse. If you’re using condoms, remember to choose a water-based condom-safe lube to be on the safe side.

Don’t skip the foreplay.

Your body has been through a lot, and pregnancy changes things down there even if you didn’t deliver vaginally. Going slow with lots of massage (remember, lube is your new BFF), especially in the perineal area, will help you relax and enjoy yourself more. Even if you aren’t quite ready to jump back into sex with penetration yet, massage and taking the time to connect with your partner is never a bad call.

If you’re a partner reading this, some new turn-ons to add to your repertoire are helping make sure mom is rested, has had a chance to shower, and putting in some extra help with household tasks. Real talk: it’s hard to get in the mood when you’re exhausted, covered in spit-up, and thinking about all the things that need to get done around the house.

Your boobs might leak.

If you’re breastfeeding, you might experience some leaking during sex or orgasm.  That’s normal, and throwing down a towel before things really get going is a good idea. If it’s close to your baby’s next feeding, you might be a little engorged and any position that puts pressure against your breasts might feel uncomfortable. Your nipples will probably feel sensitive and it could be awhile before they have another purpose besides feeding your baby. They’ll adjust to their dual-purpose life soon enough.

You’re going to get interrupted.

Nothing kills the mood quite like a screaming baby.

It’s going to happen, and nobody really talks about how strange that can be for first-time parents. It’s hard to flip the switch from “sexy time” to “oh wait, I have to parent now” and back again. You may have to stop in the middle, tend to your baby, and get back to things, or your baby might thwart that plan entirely. Be patient with yourself if you find that switch difficult and have trouble getting back into the mood.

You will get used to it as your adorable interrupter gets bigger and keeps interrupting (That’s a thing now, btw. They will keep doing that- ask a fellow parent). Chalk it up to the joys of parenting, laugh it off, and try again soon. If you haven’t already, this might be a good time to start helping your baby get used to sleeping in their crib. Even if you aren’t ready to transition full-time, having the option to start there is handy.

Get creative!

The end of a long day of momming might not be the best time for you to have sex right now. Morning or afternoon may be better for you if your partner is available. Baby asleep in your room? Get creative with other locations. Intimacy is important, and sometimes as a parent you have to get it when you can and where you can. Don’t worry, you’ll figure it out. Have fun!

 

The Six Week Checkup

The six week checkup is the last vestige of your pregnancy and an important appointment you don’t want to miss.

Besides the much-anticipated (or feared) “all-clear,” what’s the point? We’ll break it down for you so that you can get the most out of your appointment.

six week checkup postpartum

Why six weeks?

That initial post-birth Mack Truck feeling has subsided, you’ve stopped bleeding, you might even be getting a little more sleep (if not, we have a doula for that!), and you’re starting to get used to your new post-baby body.  You’re entertaining the thought of having sex again one day. Maybe. You might feel fine, but remember that birth left a placenta-sized wound in your uterus, and that wound takes around six weeks to fully heal. Introducing anything into the vagina before then increases your likelihood of infection, which is the last thing you need with a newborn to care for!

What happens during the six week checkup?

During your visit, your OB/GYN will sit down with you and ask you questions about your postpartum recovery. If you have any questions about your delivery, now is a good time to ask. If you had any kind of perineal or internal tearing, or had a cesarean delivery, your OB may want to take a look to make sure everything is healed correctly.

If you are struggling with incontinence or pain, you can ask your OB for a referral to a pelvic physiotherapist to help get your muscles back in shape.

Your OB will discuss contraception with you if you are trying to avoid another pregnancy. Remember, you can ovulate before you have that first period, and breastfeeding is not a reliable form of birth control.

Your OB will also give you a questionnaire called the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale to screen you for any kind of postpartum mood disorders.

About that postpartum depression questionnaire…

The Edinburgh Scale is a tool to screen for postpartum mood disorders, but don’t be afraid to speak up if you’re struggling but don’t identify with the questions. Your mental health as a postpartum mother is extremely important, and your OB is there to help. If you feel like you would like medication, most OB/GYNs are familiar with standard first-line treatments. He or she may want to monitor you for hormone changes as well.

Having a baby isn’t all sunshine and rainbows. Sometimes it’s loneliness, scary thoughts, mood swings, anxiety, feeling hopeless and misunderstood, resentment, crying spells, or a whole host of other not-fun symptoms.

Please hear us when we tell you that you do NOT have to struggle alone. Your feelings aren’t silly or insignificant and you matter! There are moms who have been there and there is help available. If you are in Memphis, Appleseeds, Inc. is a local non-profit that specializes in maternal mental health and provides affordable individual therapy, support groups, and workshops.

Should I bring my baby?

Up to you! Your OB/GYN and staff will probably be thrilled to meet your baby and see how much they’ve changed since birth. This is a fun photo-op, especially if you have a great relationship with your doctor. If you feel like you want to take that time for yourself without any distractions, there’s nothing wrong with that! Your partner or a friend/family member can keep the baby or go with you, or your postpartum doula can help if you prefer.

You don’t have to wait six weeks

If you have a question or a concern before six weeks, don’t wait! Call and make an appointment if you feel like something needs to be addressed before your scheduled six week visit.

 

 

 

How to diaper a newborn | Bitty Baby Basics

Diapering a baby seems pretty straightforward, right? Ask a new parent and you’ll find that’s not quite the case.

Sure, the basic concept is simple, but how do you know if you’ve got the right fit, if you’re using the right size, common culprits for those pesky leaks and blowouts? And what’s the deal with cloth diapers? We’re talking about diapering in part 3 of our Bitty Baby Basics Facebook Live video series with our tiny newborn co-host (who had a lot to say this time!) and co-owner Lindsey Hanna.

How to make sure your baby’s diaper fits

When checking for fit with a disposable diaper, you want to make sure that the waist is neither too loose nor too tight. A good rule of thumb is that you should be able to fit your finger between the diaper and the baby, but not much else. The legs should have no gaps, and make sure you have fanned out the elastic so that it’s not inside the diaper. If you have a boy, make sure the penis is pointed down or the diaper will leak out the top. The gussets in a diaper are the protective barrier and what keeps the poop off of your baby’s clothes ;).

It’s time to size up when the diaper fits well, but you start to experience leaks and blowouts. With longer, leaner babies you may start to see a bit of “plumber’s crack” as they outgrow the diaper in length, and with more chunky babies you might see their bottoms coming out the sides at the leg. When you size up, or if you’re between sizes, make sure the diaper is tight around the waist to ensure that there aren’t any gaps in the leg.

What’s the deal with cloth diapers?

Cloth diaper tutorials abound online, but in our video we give a basic overview of different kinds of cloth diapers available.

All-in-one diapers: The diaper is in one piece, and there’s nothing to stuff. It goes on much like a disposable and can only be used once. All-in-ones are available in both newborn and one-size diapers for bigger babies.

Pocket diapers: These diapers have a soft inner layer and can be stuffed with an insert or other absorbent materials. You can find them with snaps or velcro closure, and they are highly adjustable to your growing baby. A standard one-size pocket diaper will last your baby from the disposable equivalent of size 1-2 all the way up to size 6! With a one-size pocket diaper, there are snaps to adjust both the waist/leg and the rise of diaper (how tall it is).

Newborn pocket diapers: A smaller version of the pocket diaper. These will often come with a couple of settings and last from about 8lbs and until 3-4 months old.

Diaper cover: In our video, we show a one-size diaper cover. There is no soft inner layer and you place your baby’s diaper directly onto the waterproof layer and against the baby’s skin. You can put absorbent material in a cover, or put it over a disposable to prevent blowouts.  Options to go in a cover include an insert made of cotton, bamboo, or charcoal bamboo, prefolds, and flats/flour sack towels. Prefolds and flat diapers can be folded to lay in or folded and fastened onto your baby.

How to swaddle a newborn | Bitty Baby Basics

 Learn how to swaddle a newborn with Bitty Baby Basics: A Newborn Care How-to Series (Facebook Live)!

If you’re a new parent or parent-to-be and don’t have much experience with newborns, this series is for you. Caring for a live, wiggling newborn is a whole new ballgame compared to the demo dolls you may have encountered in parenting classes. We’ll be taking time during this Live series to highlight different aspects of baby care, with our own newborn baby to demonstrate so that you can have a glimpse into what it’s really like. We’ll share our tips and tricks so that you can feel confident with your bitty bundle!

Swaddling is a skill that often leaves new parents feeling frustrated.

We’ll de-mystify it for you in this video and show you how to do a basic swaddle with an aden+anais muslin swaddle blanket, how to use a SwaddleMe velcro swaddle, and sleep sacks for when your baby is too big to swaddle anymore.

Help! My baby doesn’t like to to be swaddled!

Yes they do. Sure, some babies legitimately don’t like being swaddled, but in our experience most of the time it’s not that the baby hates a swaddle. There’s a learning curve and a poorly-done swaddle is often rejected by a newborn who just wants to be snug as a bug in a rug. Here’s some tips to remember:

Babies don’t like getting swaddled. They like being swaddled.

Don’t worry if your baby fusses and complains while you’re swaddling with them. If you’ve done it correctly, then your baby should be easy to soothe quickly after you finish.

Your swaddle probably isn’t tight enough.

No, you aren’t going to hurt your baby. Chances are your baby doesn’t like the swaddle because it’s not tight enough. Muslin in particular is a very stretchy material that gives almost immediately after you let it go, which means you have to pull it much tighter initially so that when you tuck that last tail in, the fabric relaxes into a comfortable snugness for your baby. Same goes with the “cheater” velcro swaddles.

Don’t swaddle once you see signs of rolling, or phase it out if your baby is 8 weeks old or more.

If you have a very young newborn, think 1-3 weeks, you might see them roll to their side naturally when you put them down. This is an infantile reflex and not the rolling you are looking for. Once your baby shows signs of rolling from front to back or back to front, it’s important to stop swaddling immediately. A baby who is swaddled cannot turn themselves back over and is at risk for suffocation.

Skip the blankets in the crib and move from a swaddle to a sleep sack.

Blankets in the crib are another big hazard for small babies, so it’s best to save them for snuggling. When your baby graduates from a swaddle, move them to a wearable blanket called a sleep sack. These are made by many different companies, including Halo, aden+anais, IKEA, Gerber, Carter’s etc… they are easy to find, easy to use, and safe for your baby. Make sure you don’t put your baby in a sleep sack that is too big.

How to dress a newborn | Bitty Baby Basics

Bitty Baby Basics: A Newborn Care How-to Series (Facebook Live)

If you’re a new parent or parent-to-be and don’t have much experience with newborns, this series is for you. Caring for a live, wiggling newborn is a whole new ballgame compared to the demo dolls you may have encountered in parenting classes. We’ll be taking time on the Doulas of Memphis Facebook Page during this Live series to highlight different aspects of baby care, with our own newborn baby to demonstrate so that you can have a glimpse into what it’s really like. We’ll share our tips and tricks so that you can feel confident with your bitty bundle!

In our first video, we talk about how to dress those sweet scrunched-up squishes with confidence and ease, and whatever else we encounter along the way.

Our #1 Rule for Dressing a Newborn: Don’t hesitate!

Many parents fear they’re going to hurt their baby if they dress them too quickly, so they take their time and try to be as gentle as possible. While this is well-intentions, it also has the result of making newborn babies really, really mad. You don’t have to be rough to be firm and efficient! You won’t break the baby, we promise! Watch to learn more:

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How Hard Could It Be?

When I had my first baby, it was the first time I had ever seen a newborn in person. I’d changed maybe two diapers, ever. In short, I was clueless.

My husband, John, helped his mom run her in-home daycare when he was younger. As far as I was concerned, he would be a diaper changing pro! The rest of the stuff like holding a baby, or soothing them, well, he’d probably remember it. Like riding a bike or something, right? Never mind the fact that he was a child when he did all this (seriously, what was I thinking?)

I had family in town. My own mother, in fact, lived just a few minutes away. And this was her first grandchild, so of course she’d be over all the time and would help fill in any blanks.

So Rex came out, we all got cleaned up and tucked into bed to rest, and suddenly, my husband and I were alone with a brand new baby.

I remember thinking it was a little bit ridiculous that we were expected to be able to take care of this baby without any practice or formal knowledge, completely responsible for someone else’s WHOLE LIFE. I mean, sure, people have been doing this since the beginning of time, but WE had never done it before!

I’m pretty good at rolling with whatever comes my way, so we jumped right in.

John was great at helping with diapers. We might have eaten more take-out than I cared to, but that was ok. My mom was happy to spend her free time with her first grandbaby. But she had to work, too. And eventually, John had to return to work.

Nights were relatively easy – John was home, even if I did feel bad waking him up to help me when I felt overwhelmed, knowing he had to work in the morning. Sometimes I woke him up on purpose, just because I was so irritated at being woken up yet again, and hey, this is his kid, too. (I love you, dear!)

Days were another story.

I was tired but unable to nap

“Sleep when the baby sleeps” is impossible when you feel compelled to clean house and get the chores caught up. Or shower. Or eat.

I was bored out of my mind

Babies don’t make great conversationalists. Who knew?

I was jealous

My husband got to actually go spend time outside the house talking with other adults, even if they were just coworkers, and the only other place he went was work.

I was jealous that other people were able to take care of themselves, their children, and their homes, apparently without breaking a sweat.

I suddenly didn’t feel comfortable or confident

It took more energy than I ever thought just to pack the baby up and get him into the car, and nursing in public or dealing with a crying baby in public was just too much, so I never went anywhere. I used to be a smart, career-minded woman, an organized go-getter. How had this small person reduced me to this? Why didn’t anyone warn me?

I needed a postpartum doula. If only I had known there was such a thing.

Magical postpartum doula fairy
The postpartum doulas you hire won’t have wings, but you’ll swear they have magic sleeping baby fairy dust.

Abby says postpartum doulas are like a fairy godmother, and I have to agree.

Postpartum doulas are the women who have seen it all, so they are great troubleshooters when things aren’t going well.

They are the ones who let you sleep (or shower!) while they magically take care of the baby AND get some of your chores checked off, or get dinner started so your husband can relax, too.

The wonderful postpartum doulas I know are also the best listeners. You’d be amazed at how easy they are to talk to – so understanding, so loving and caring, and somehow they always leave you feeling content and refreshed. That’s way more than I can say for some of the friends and relatives that visited after Rex was born!

Postpartum doulas are more popular now than ever, and for good reason. Doulas of Memphis offers some of the very best doulas in the area, and they are worth their weight in gold.

Scheduling a consultation is quick and easy, and you’ll be so glad you did it.

Holidays and inducing labor

If you’re due around the holidays, you may have heard quips like, “Thanksgiving is not a medical indication for induction of labor!” The implication is that induction of labor rises around holidays and that physician convenience is to blame. We feel this language is damaging and a more nuanced approach is in order.

Having an estimated due date that falls close to a major holiday can come with its own set of challenges. When it comes to holidays and inducing labor, there are many factors at play, and physician convenience is usually at the bottom.

While many wouldn’t dream of inducing labor because of a holiday, there are others who see it as the best, most logical choice for their family.

So, why would someone induce labor around a major holiday?

holidays and inducing labor
Your medical team likes Thanksgiving as much as anyone, but they are committed to giving you the best care every day of the year.

Some women choose an induction before a holiday to ensure their primary physician will be there.

You researched your physician carefully and chose them because you felt like they were the best doctor for you. You trust them and have spent your entire pregnancy building a relationship with them and discussing your preferences. You feel you’ll get the best care from them. They know you and understand you, and it’s important to you that they are there to deliver your baby, but you know they won’t be in town for Thanksgiving (or another holiday). Elective inductions without a medical reason are discouraged before 39 weeks gestation, but if you’re on the cusp of your due date and have the okay from your physician to induce labor, then it’s a perfectly valid choice and one that we won’t judge you for.

Some women choose induction because they want/don’t want to have their baby on a specific holiday.

For some, the decision about holidays and inducing labor comes from a desire to have their baby on a specific holiday. The idea of a Thanksgiving or Christmas baby is special to them. For others, it’s the exact opposite, and they don’t want their child to feel overshadowed on their birthday because of the holiday. If you’ve got a New Year’s baby on the way, taxes can be a huge issue for families as well. All of these are valid choices when they are made with your physician.

Some women choose to induce before a holiday so they can spend that holiday at home.

The desire not to spend Thanksgiving, Christmas, or any other major holiday in the hospital is certainly understandable. You might choose to induce before a holiday to ensure that you can be home with your family, propped up on the couch with your newborn with a plate of your favorite comfort food in your hands.

Some women induce around a holiday because they know they will have lots of family support.

Not everyone has family locally, and a woman may choose to induce around a holiday so that her out-of-town family can meet the baby and that there will be plenty of help to go around. Once your family heads back home, our postpartum doulas make the perfect holiday gift and can always pick up where your family left off.

Even if you aren’t concerned about holidays and inducing labor, know that the doctors and hospital staff are there to support you every day of the year, even on holidays.

Your doctors and nurses have dedicated years of their lives to learning how to care for you during your pregnancy and birth. Whether they work in a group or solo practice, they all understand that holiday births are part of the job. Many physicians work in group practices and know ahead of time when their call schedule falls on a major holiday, and they are ready to come to you in the same way your birth doula is ready to come to you, day or night.

At Doulas of Memphis, we support your decisions for your birth and respect the relationships and choices you make with your trusted physicians. Our opinion on holidays and inducing labor? We don’t have one outside of the choice that you feel is best for you.

 

Planning for baby? | Mom Self Care Free Printable

When you’re planning for baby, the vast majority of pregnancy and birth checklists out there all about what you need to do for your baby. But what about you? Giving birth is a feat no matter how you do it, and in the flurry and excitement of packing, it’s easy to forget about the things you’ll need after baby is here!

planning for baby
Planning for baby is no easy task!

Planning for baby means planning for you, too. We asked some veteran moms about their must-have items for the hospital and back home. Here’s what they said:

Of course you’re going to pack toiletries and clothes for you and baby. Here’s what to pack in your hospital bag for you:

Pillows from home: Because we know hospital pillows aren’t known for their extra-fluffiness.
Extra-long charging cable: Keep in touch when you want, from anywhere in your room. Oh, and Netflix.
Chapstick: Trust us, it’s a must-have.
Mints: Freshen up until you can brush your teeth again.
Comfy leggings or pajama pants: There’s nothing quite like slipping on a pair of cozy pants after a nice shower.
Soft, light robe: Be visitor-ready in no time!
Fuzzy blanket from home: Hospital blankets are thin, and who doesn’t love a fuzzy throw?
Your favorite instant coffee (ex. Starbucks Via): Coffee emergencies are a thing.
Water bottle: Skip the styrofoam and stay hydrated in style!
Snacks for after birth: Your favorite takeout menus and a Designated Bringer of Food wouldn’t hurt, either.
Post-birth beverage: Finally, you can have that drink you’ve been craving your whole pregnancy!
Nursing pillow: Save your neck and arms by bringing baby up closer to you.
Nursing tanks/clothes to labor in: Nursing tanks are great for skin-to-skin after birth. Pair with a knee-length maxi skirt for an alternative to that hospital gown.
Button-down or pull-down shirts: for easy nursing access.

You’re back home with all of your stuff, and a new baby. Here’s what to keep around for those days after birth:

Depends (No really, trust us!): Because it’s no fun when your pad moves around.
Tucks Pads:
A common hemorrhoid relief, but they’re oh-so-nice for a sore perineum too!
Peri Bottle:
A lifesaver when wiping is the last thing you want to do.
Constipation relief:
No shame in that stool softener game!
Water bottle:
Between taking care of a newborn, nursing, and recovering from birth, hydration in reach is essential!
Late-night snack basket:
When nighttime hunger strikes, you’ll be prepared.
Dim night light:
So you can see to change that diaper and then get everyone back to dreamland
Freezer meals:
Consider hosting a freezer meal shower to stock up before baby comes.
One-handed snacks:
Feed baby and yourself at the same time!
Fresh, cut-up fruits and veggies:
Because you can only eat so much lasagna.
Baby carrier:
For hands-free snuggling and walking around.
Lanolin/nipple butter:
Relief for nipples that are adjusting to a newborn feeding schedule.
Journal: A place for your thoughts and feelings.
Extra phone chargers:
It’s no fun when you phone dies and you’re stuck under a baby. 
Postpartum doula: 
A postpartum doula is a valuable member of your village! We’re there to make sure you have all of the help, rest, and support you need after baby comes home.

Love our list? What would you add?

Click here to download our Mom Self Care Free Printable!

mom-self-care-free-printable

What’s New: Safe Sleep Guidelines

The Internet is abuzz with the AAP new safe sleep guidelines that were released on October 24th. So what do these new sleep recommendations mean for Memphis families?

safe sleep

The new safe sleep guidelines acknowledge the real-life experience of families with infants.

The ABC’s of safe sleep encourage families to put their infant to sleep Alone, on their Back, and in a Crib that is free of clutter like blankets, positioners, toys, and crib bumpers. While sharing a room with your baby is recommended, sharing a bed is not, and falling asleep with your baby on a couch or recliner is the biggest no-no of them all. However, the AAP acknowledged in their safe sleep update that sometimes babies do wind up in the parent’s bed and offered some advice. From the Healthy Children website:

Only bring your baby into your bed to feed or comfort. Place your baby back in his or her own sleep space when you are ready to go to sleep. If there is any possibility that you might fall asleep, make sure there are no pillows, sheets, blankets, or any other items that could cover your baby’s face, head, and neck, or overheat your baby. As soon as you wake up, be sure to move the baby to his or her own bed.

At Doulas of Memphis, we are most excited about this update because it promotes vigilance without putting added guilt and pressure onto families who are trying the best they can to get the rest that they need. Who doesn’t love a little nonjudgmental support? If you are struggling with sleep with your baby, our overnight postpartum doulas can help.

Safe sleep is possible without all of the extra bells and whistles. With all the products and sleep aids out there, many parents are left feeling confused as to what is safe and what is not.

Products that claim to “prevent SIDS” are a marketing ploy that preys on parent’s fears. In reality, there is no definitive way to prevent SIDS and many of these products have not undergone the rigorous safety testing through organizations like the FDA, the CSPC, or the AAP. Home heart monitors may provide peace of mind, but are never a substitute for the advice of your pediatrician. In regard to co-sleepers, Healthy Children says:

There isn’t enough research on bedside or in-bed sleepers. The AAP can’t recommend for or against these products because there have been no studies that have looked at their effect on SIDS or if they increase the risk of injury and death from suffocation.

If your baby likes a swaddle, that’s great, and the AAP encourages families to place swaddled babies on their back, in a swaddle that isn’t too tight and allows free hip movement, and to cease swaddling once you suspect your baby will begin rolling over.

Our doulas will always follow the AAP Recommendations for Safe Infant Sleep, but we also trust that parents are able to do what’s best for their families. Sleep safe and sleep well!

 

 

Mom Olympics | Lessons from Rio 2016

The Rio 2016 Olympics ended yesterday, and over the past couple of weeks the world has seen endurance, resourcefulness, compassion, heartbreak, triumph, controversy, and togetherness on display. In a world where parenting sometimes feels like an Olympic sport, there’s a lot for moms to learn from this year’s summer Olympics.

Olympics

Moms win the gold for doing the best they can with what they have.

The Rio 2016 Olympics was fraught with infrastructure obstacles and budgetary concerns. During the opening ceremony, we saw resourcefulness on display with the use of a projection system to both cut costs and create some pretty sweet special effects. As moms, we are all operating with limited resources. Likewise as moms, we have limited time, funds, energy, sleep…and somehow we dig deep within ourselves and give our children the best we can with what we have. There are no participation medals in the real Olympics, but in the Mom Olympics, we know you’re giving it your all and we honor you!

Sometimes, no matter how hard we try, the diving pool turns green.

It wasn’t green yesterday! The pool next to it isn’t green! Oh crap, now we have to swim in this?! It happens at the Olympics, and it happens to us as moms. Sometimes our best-laid plans turn green no matter how much chlorine we put in yesterday. On days when that grocery trip is an epic fail, when Netflix during naptime doesn’t happen, when breastfeeding isn’t going as planned, when you don’t know where the day went wrong, moms keep swimming, ready to dive headfirst into a new day tomorrow.

Moms win the gold for helping each other up when the race gets rough.

The day-to-day of motherhood can feel like a running-in-circles race, and it’s not always smooth track ahead. Even the best of us trip and fall, and that’s when we can count on our mom friends to help us up, put an arm around us, hand us a cup of coffee, and keep going with us. There’s a lot of divisiveness around parenting, but there will always be the Nikki Hamblins and Abbey D’Agostinos out there who meet us in our struggles and encourage us along the way.

The Rio Olympics showed us that women are powerful, strong, and capable. Doulas help moms dig in and find the strength that’s always been there.

At this year’s Olympics, our female athletes made us proud. From Gabby Douglas to Simone Biles, Michelle Carter, Kate Ledecky and more, we saw time and time again that women are amazing and strong. Although they alone were responsible for doing the work, many Olympians acknowledge members of their support team that have helped them along the way. Doulas come faithfully alongside moms as they find strength, endurance, and courage during pregnancy, birth, and the early days of parenting. At Doulas of Memphis, we help you prepare for birth, and when the big day comes, we’re there to lean on, cheer you on, and hold you up physically and emotionally as you do the hard work of birth. We believe in you and your ability to make the best decisions for your family. After baby is home and the real marathon begins, our postpartum doulas support you day and night to help ensure that you get the rest you need, that you get answers to your questions, and we’ll even help keep you fed and nourished as you care for and bond with your newest little Olympian.

Interested in adding a birth doula or postpartum doula to your support team? Give us a call or drop us a line and let us know how we can partner with your family!