Holidays and inducing labor

If you're due around the holidays, you may have heard quips like, "Thanksgiving is not a medical indication for induction of labor!" The implication is that induction of labor rises around holidays and that physician convenience is to blame. We feel this language is damaging and a more nuanced approach is in order.

Having an estimated due date that falls close to a major holiday can come with its own set of challenges. When it comes to holidays and inducing labor, there are many factors at play, and physician convenience is usually at the bottom.

While many wouldn't dream of inducing labor because of a holiday, there are others who see it as the best, most logical choice for their family.

So, why would someone induce labor around a major holiday?

holidays and inducing labor

Some women choose an induction before a holiday to ensure their primary physician will be there.

You researched your physician carefully and chose them because you felt like they were the best doctor for you. You trust them and have spent your entire pregnancy building a relationship with them and discussing your preferences. You feel you'll get the best care from them. They know you and understand you, and it's important to you that they are there to deliver your baby, but you know they won't be in town for Thanksgiving (or another holiday). Elective inductions without a medical reason are discouraged before 39 weeks gestation, but if you're on the cusp of your due date and have the okay from your physician to induce labor, then it's a perfectly valid choice and one that we won't judge you for.

Some women choose induction because they want/don't want to have their baby on a specific holiday.

For some, the decision about holidays and inducing labor comes from a desire to have their baby on a specific holiday. The idea of a Thanksgiving or Christmas baby is special to them. For others, it's the exact opposite, and they don't want their child to feel overshadowed on their birthday because of the holiday. If you've got a New Year's baby on the way, taxes can be a huge issue for families as well. All of these are valid choices when they are made with your physician.

Some women choose to induce before a holiday so they can spend that holiday at home.

The desire not to spend Thanksgiving, Christmas, or any other major holiday in the hospital is certainly understandable. You might choose to induce before a holiday to ensure that you can be home with your family, propped up on the couch with your newborn with a plate of your favorite comfort food in your hands.

Some women induce around a holiday because they know they will have lots of family support.

Not everyone has family locally, and a woman may choose to induce around a holiday so that her out-of-town family can meet the baby and that there will be plenty of help to go around. Once your family heads back home, our postpartum doulas make the perfect holiday gift and can always pick up where your family left off.

Even if you aren't concerned about holidays and inducing labor, know that the doctors and hospital staff are there to support you every day of the year, even on holidays.

Your doctors and nurses have dedicated years of their lives to learning how to care for you during your pregnancy and birth. Whether they work in a group or solo practice, they all understand that holiday births are part of the job. Many physicians work in group practices and know ahead of time when their call schedule falls on a major holiday, and they are ready to come to you in the same way your birth doula is ready to come to you, day or night.

At Doulas of Memphis, we support your decisions for your birth and respect the relationships and choices you make with your trusted physicians. Our opinion on holidays and inducing labor? We don't have one outside of the choice that you feel is best for you.