Holidays and inducing labor

If you're due around the holidays, you may have heard quips like, "Thanksgiving is not a medical indication for induction of labor!" The implication is that induction of labor rises around holidays and that physician convenience is to blame. We feel this language is damaging and a more nuanced approach is in order.

Having an estimated due date that falls close to a major holiday can come with its own set of challenges. When it comes to holidays and inducing labor, there are many factors at play, and physician convenience is usually at the bottom.

While many wouldn't dream of inducing labor because of a holiday, there are others who see it as the best, most logical choice for their family.

So, why would someone induce labor around a major holiday?

holidays and inducing labor

Some women choose an induction before a holiday to ensure their primary physician will be there.

You researched your physician carefully and chose them because you felt like they were the best doctor for you. You trust them and have spent your entire pregnancy building a relationship with them and discussing your preferences. You feel you'll get the best care from them. They know you and understand you, and it's important to you that they are there to deliver your baby, but you know they won't be in town for Thanksgiving (or another holiday). Elective inductions without a medical reason are discouraged before 39 weeks gestation, but if you're on the cusp of your due date and have the okay from your physician to induce labor, then it's a perfectly valid choice and one that we won't judge you for.

Some women choose induction because they want/don't want to have their baby on a specific holiday.

For some, the decision about holidays and inducing labor comes from a desire to have their baby on a specific holiday. The idea of a Thanksgiving or Christmas baby is special to them. For others, it's the exact opposite, and they don't want their child to feel overshadowed on their birthday because of the holiday. If you've got a New Year's baby on the way, taxes can be a huge issue for families as well. All of these are valid choices when they are made with your physician.

Some women choose to induce before a holiday so they can spend that holiday at home.

The desire not to spend Thanksgiving, Christmas, or any other major holiday in the hospital is certainly understandable. You might choose to induce before a holiday to ensure that you can be home with your family, propped up on the couch with your newborn with a plate of your favorite comfort food in your hands.

Some women induce around a holiday because they know they will have lots of family support.

Not everyone has family locally, and a woman may choose to induce around a holiday so that her out-of-town family can meet the baby and that there will be plenty of help to go around. Once your family heads back home, our postpartum doulas make the perfect holiday gift and can always pick up where your family left off.

Even if you aren't concerned about holidays and inducing labor, know that the doctors and hospital staff are there to support you every day of the year, even on holidays.

Your doctors and nurses have dedicated years of their lives to learning how to care for you during your pregnancy and birth. Whether they work in a group or solo practice, they all understand that holiday births are part of the job. Many physicians work in group practices and know ahead of time when their call schedule falls on a major holiday, and they are ready to come to you in the same way your birth doula is ready to come to you, day or night.

At Doulas of Memphis, we support your decisions for your birth and respect the relationships and choices you make with your trusted physicians. Our opinion on holidays and inducing labor? We don't have one outside of the choice that you feel is best for you.

 

You Do You: Children's Book Life Lessons

Even before I had children of my own, I was an avid collector of children's books. I would keep them in my apartment, give them as gifts, and at bookstores you could always find me foraging through the children's section more enthusiastically than a 6-year-old.  I love them as art, and I love how they can distill life lessons in such a way that even kids can understand. Tennessee has a program called Dolly Parton's Imagination Library, where families sign up to receive one book a month from birth to age 5.  One of my son's favorites is called Stand Tall, Molly Lou Melon, written by Patty Lovell and illustrated by David Catrow. The lesson? You do you! You do you, molly lou melon

Stand Tall, Molly Lou Melon is a book about being your most authentic self no matter your circumstances or what other people say about you.

Molly Lou Melon is a tiny little girl with a big personality and the best grandma ever. By anyone's standards, Molly Lou Melon doesn't have a lot going for her: She's short, has buck teeth, has a terrible singing voice, AND she's the new kid at school. One thing Molly Lou Melon DOES have going for her is that her grandma has given her some advice:

"Walk as proudly as you can and the world will look up to you."

"Smile big and the world will smile right alongside you."

"Sing out clear and strong and the world will cry tears of joy."

"Believe in yourself and the world will believe in you too."

Grandma's advice serves Molly Lou Melon well as she encounters bully Ronald Durkin at school. We never find out what Ronald Durkin's problem is, but he doesn't know when to quit! Molly Lou Melon doesn't entertain his negativity and instead adopts the motto, "You do you." If Molly Lou Melon cares what Ronald Durkin thinks, the reader never knows. She does her own thing, is her most authentic self, and at the end of the week when she wins Ronald Durkin over, she writes her grandma a letter to tell her she was right.

Whether you're a parent, doula, new kid, or just trying to get along in the world, you WILL encounter people who seem to feel threatened by your mere existence in their world. Stand tall, friend, and you do you.

It is tempting to be something less than our most authentic selves in the face of disagreement, negativity, passive-aggressive comments, or even bullying from others. The problem? It never works.

Your most authentic self will never be good enough for some people, and making the opinions of others the metric for your worth as a person will always lead to disappointment. 

Being our most authentic selves doesn't mean we get to do and say whatever we want free of consequence, but it does free us from being beholden to the opinions of others. Molly Lou Melon doesn't go out of her way to impress anyone; instead, she stays true to herself and in the end finds acceptance and is able to share her gifts with those around her. What if she had hidden and pretended to be something else, or made her life about impressing Ronald Durkin? I don't know about you, but I'm sure glad that wasn't her story! And you know what? It doesn't have to be yours, either!

you do you, molly lou melon

 

Take a page out of Stand Tall, Molly Lou Melon: shine bright and give the world the best version of you!

Relationships after baby: What to expect

As we grow and reach new milestones in our lives, our relationships with those around us change and evolve. Relationships after baby are no different, but oftentimes new parents are blindsided by how much their relationships change when a new baby is added into the picture. Many are surprised by how much their world shrinks compared to how things were before children. During this time of adjustment, parents may deal with extra stress, tension, feelings of isolation and loneliness, and perhaps even a bit of grief over the loss of freedom to which they were accustomed. All of these feelings are normal, but they don't have to define you or your relationships! relationships after baby

Relationships after baby: Spouse/Partner

For many couples, marriage and learning how to live together is a big adjustment. You learn how to balance your life with someone else's in a way that you didn't have to before you were under one roof- reconciling schedules, household management, meals, habits and idiosyncrasies are parts of truly becoming one unit. When you add a pregnancy and then a baby into the mix, that routine becomes disrupted, particularly in the newborn days. There's another person to balance now and it takes time to arrive at that new feeling of "normal."  Becoming a parent changes you, and it will change how you interact with your spouse, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. Be patient with each other as you grow into you new roles. Keep the lines of communication open. Take a little time every day to connect, even in a small way. Maybe it's not quite the same as it was before, but you'll find more things to love about each other along the way. If you're struggling, never be ashamed to ask for help! You don't exist in a vacuum and there is support out there for you if you want and/or need it.

Relationships after baby: Family

When you have a baby, the dynamic of the family you grew up in shifts, too:  It's your turn to have a crack at this whole parenting business, and your loved ones may deal with that in a variety of ways. Some may be supportive no matter what, while others seem to question every choice you make. When faced with negativity, the important thing to remember is that their feelings are about them and not about you. Respecting where they came from as parents and setting healthy boundaries at the start can free you up to enjoy your relationships with your family. Chances are your family cares about you and your baby and wants to see you succeed, and supportive family is a gift both to you and to your child!

Relationships after baby: Friends

Much in the same way that getting married can change your friendships, so can having a baby. The friends you had in college or when you were single may not be in the same place in life that you are right now. They might seem like they're in an entirely different world, and you can't remember the last time you got together, or when you do finally sit down for lunch you may struggle to relate to where they are right now. It's true that some of your friendships might fizzle out, but your friends don't have to be in the same stage as you are for you to have a relationship with them. The ones who stick around and weather each change with you? Treasure those friendships. Cultivate them. Include them in the life of your family. I promise you're not too boring for them. They know that you'll get your night out soon and that one day you'll be able to invest in them more, and that's okay.

Relationships after baby: Your baby (and siblings)

Even your relationship with your baby will change over time- after all, you've just met and are starting from scratch! As you learn your baby's habits and get glimpses of his or her personality, you'll become more responsive as a parent and will likely find more enjoyment in spending time with your baby. Some parents feel bonded to their baby immediately. Others take extra time, and that's okay too! You may already have other children and are juggling their needs with the needs of your newborn. Children are forgiving, resilient, and know that you love them and care for them. Time with your older children will look different too, but they'll also have their own relationships to build with their new brother or sister. Perhaps they'll even have more chances to build stronger relationships with other loved ones.

You'll find your way...together.

Part of what we do as postpartum doulas is help you figure out how to integrate your new baby into your existing family and relationships. We're happy to help care for you and support you as you figure out how it all fits together.  Give us a call at (901) 308-4888 or drop us a line and let's start a conversation about how we can serve your family!

 

Spring is coming: Getting help with postpartum depression

lion-1145040_640The old kindergarten adage is true again this year: “March comes in like a lion, and out like a lamb.” We see it around us and feel it in the air that yes, spring is coming in all of its humid, rainy glory. I love a good analogy, and this changing season has me thinking about a time in my life when I thought winter was never going to end.

I should have seen it coming, but suffice it to say that with my firstborn I was the poster child for postpartum depression and anxiety.

We had only been back in Memphis for three months before my son was born. I wish I could say we adjusted well to being parents, and those first few months were magical, but that’s simply not true. It was isolating and it was hard. Really hard. My baby was well-cared for and I adored him, but I struggled to do daily tasks. I would fly off the handle at the most insignificant things, couldn’t cope with the lack of sleep, and couldn’t seem to make it past showering and getting dressed. I’d sit on my couch with my baby and there I’d stay, until 5pm rolled around and I had nothing to show for my day. I thought it was “just stress,” or that “this is what those first few months are like...after all, I’m rocking my baby and babies don’t keep, right?” I wasn’t crying all the time, so I couldn’t be depressed, right? My precious husband picked up my slack the best he could but while he was my safety net, there wasn't anyone catching him. 

It was six months before I got help. Six months before I couldn’t take it anymore. Six months before my husband said, “This isn’t normal.”

I felt like I was losing my mind. I was overwhelmed and wracked with guilt. I was terrified of what people would think of me. Nothing sent me running faster than the Standard Southern Greeting of “How are you?” I didn’t know how to answer that question- what if they didn’t actually want to know? Even after I started counseling, it took me more than a year to feel normal again. There were pieces to pick up after months of going it alone.  As I was living day to day with a baby to care for,  it was hard to see any sort of growth. Some days I wondered if I would ever get better. If I would ever feel like myself again...who was I again, anyway? I couldn't pinpoint a day where I magically felt better, but over time things didn't seem so difficult anymore. The coping skills I learned in therapy became second nature. My relationship with my husband improved and I was doing a lot more giving and a lot less taking. That time was a lot like little glimpses of spring near the end of a long winter.

spring, postpartum depression

It may not always feel like it, but spring is coming. 

Maybe you're in a season of your life where you've planted the seeds but can't see the blooms yet. Maybe it's still raining, raining, raining, and you can't seem to catch a break. Some days are warm with tastes of sunshine to come, but others are dreary and gray. Nobody flips a switch and turns spring on. March has to come first, in like a lion and out like a lamb. Maybe it's not today, but one day the flowers will come out. The grass will be green. The chill will leave the air. Spring is coming!

If you're struggling right now, please know that there is help for you. Don't wait! You may not hear about postpartum depression and anxiety while you're out running your errands, but there are warrior moms all around you. You are not a failure. You are not a bad mom. It's not your fault. You are not alone. I'll say it again: You are not alone! 

If you want to learn more about getting help with postpartum depression and anxiety, visit Postpartum Progress and Postpartum Support International. For dads, visit http://www.postpartummen.com. If you need help locally, reach out to us and we'll help you get connected. 

What babies and tornadoes have in common

‘Tis the season for tornadoes in Memphis, Tennessee, that time of year where we don our rain boots and do our best to “Respect the Polygon.” It’s a part of life around here, both natural and a bit unsettling at times... ...kind of like having a baby.

Stay with me here. While having a baby isn’t terrifying or devastating in the way a tornado can be, they do have a lot in common.

tornadoes, babies

Tornadoes are unpredictable

While most tornadoes follow a pattern from southwest to northeast, we can never know exactly which course they will take, how strong they will be, or what they will leave in their wake. Giving birth is similar. While most labors follow a general pattern, there is plenty of room for variation. Contractions speed up or slow down, labors stall and labors come on fast and furious. With labor comes periods of anticipation and watchful waiting. We can’t always trust that nothing will go wrong, but we can have great respect for the power behind birth. All of this is natural and normal, even in its unpredictability. You never know what kind of baby you have until they are here, and you never can be totally sure what they’ll do next. A baby who sleeps her newborn days away might all of a sudden decide sleeping isn’t her thing (don’t worry, we can help!). A routine that worked last week might need a complete overhaul as your baby hits a new milestone in his development.

Tornadoes can turn your world upside down

I’ve been fortunate to have been around tornadoes my whole life, but have never had firsthand experience with the life-altering devastation they can cause. Babies are blessings and don’t shake up our worlds in the same way tornadoes do, but one thing you can count on is that your whole life will be different. In the same way that a tornado doesn’t always pass over your city without incident, birth can sometimes be difficult and sometimes babies need extra help before they can go home. Perhaps a new baby at your home has affected your relationship with your spouse in ways you weren’t expecting. Maybe postpartum depression wasn’t part of the plan, but here you are, picking up the pieces with a little one in tow. Just as we reach out for help in the face of natural disasters outside our control, it’s important to remember that if things don’t go as planned, it’s okay to ask for help. It’s okay to see your therapist, to call your doctor, to reach out to friends and family who care about you! If you don’t know where to go, ask your doula for help and she’ll connect you with a referral to get the help you need.

You can prepare for tornadoes and you can prepare for babies

In the same way that we create safe spaces and plans of action for when bad weather arises, we can create safe spaces and plans of action for when baby comes. Sure, a “go bag” has a different meaning when you’re talking about an outing with a newborn, but the concept is the same. By taking the time to think through your plan of action for birth and postpartum, you can be better prepared for whatever your own little tornado throws your way. Babies are unpredictable both in their arrival and their behavior, but we can still create safe spaces for ourselves. In addition to surrounding yourself with friends and family, a doula can help you navigate the unpredictably of birth and new parenthood and provide you with a soft place to land. We want to be there for you and help you the best we can as you stretch, grow, and gain confidence!